Coronavirus (COVID-19)

In light of the recent coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak we would like to reassure you that Croatia Times Travel understands that you may have concerns about continuing with an upcoming holiday or booking new travel. Please be assured that we are keeping up to date with the latest health advisories to our key destinations and will be posting relevant updates here. Although the information we provide is current at the time of posting, the situation is evolving daily and please always check with Safetravel NZ, government advisories and World Health Organisation (WHO) for the latest health and travel advice.

EUROPEAN UNION - 02 July 2020

30 June 2020 - EU External Action Website | EU agrees to reopen borders for Montenegro and 13 more countries from 01 July 2020

The Council agrees to start lifting travel restrictions

The European Council today adopted a recommendation on the gradual lifting of the temporary restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU. Travel restrictions should be lifted for countries listed in the recommendation, with this list being reviewed and, as the case may be, updated every two weeks.

Based on the criteria and conditions set out in the recommendation, as from 01 July member states should start lifting the travel restrictions at the external borders for residents of the following third countries:

Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity, while residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican should be considered as EU residents for the purpose of this recommendation.

The criteria to determine the third countries for which the current travel restriction should be lifted cover in particular the epidemiological situation and containment measures, including physical distancing, as well as economic and social considerations. They are applied cumulatively.

Regarding the epidemiological situation, third countries listed should meet the following criteria, in particular:

▪ number of new COVID-19 cases over the last 14 days and per 100 000 inhabitants close to or below the EU average (as it stood on 15 June 2020)
▪ stable or decreasing trend of new cases over this period in comparison to the previous 14 days
▪ overall response to COVID-19 taking into account available information, including on aspects such as testing, surveillance, contact tracing, containment, treatment and reporting, as well as the reliability of the information and, if needed, the total average score for International Health Regulations (IHR). Information provided by EU delegations on these aspects should also be taken into account.
▪ Reciprocity should also be taken into account regularly and on a case-by-case basis.

For countries where travel restrictions continue to apply, the following categories of people should be exempted from the restrictions:

▪ EU citizens and their family members
▪ long-term EU residents and their family members
▪ travellers with an essential function or need, as listed in the Recommendation.
▪ Schengen associated countries (Iceland, Lichtenstein, Norway, Switzerland) also take part in this recommendation.

Next steps

The Council recommendation is not a legally binding instrument. The authorities of the member states remain responsible for implementing the content of the recommendation. They may, in full transparency, lift only progressively travel restrictions towards countries listed. A Member State should not decide to lift the travel restrictions for non-listed third countries before this has been decided in a coordinated manner.

This list of third countries should be reviewed every two weeks and may be updated by the Council, as the case may be, after close consultations with the Commission and the relevant EU agencies and services following an overall assessment based on the criteria above.

Travel restrictions may be totally or partially lifted or reintroduced for a specific third country already listed according to changes in some of the conditions and, as a consequence, in the assessment of the epidemiological situation. If the situation in a listed third country worsens quickly, rapid decision-making should be applied.

Background

On 16 March 2020, the Commission adopted a communication recommending a temporary restriction of all non-essential travel from third countries into the EU for one month. EU heads of state or government agreed to implement this restriction on 17 March. The travel restriction was extended for a further month respectively on 8 April 2020 and 8 May 2020.

On 11 June the Commission adopted a communication recommending the further extension of the restriction until 30 June 2020 and setting out an approach for a gradual lifting of the restriction on non-essential travel into the EU as of 01 July 2020. Discussions have since then taken place between member states on the criteria and methodology to be applied.

Source: European Union | External Action | News release | 30 June 2020 | https://eeas.europa.eu/headquarters/headquarters-homepage/81808/eu-agrees-reopen-borders-montenegro-and-13-more-countries-1-july_en

 

11 June 2020 - EU Commission Website | Commission recommends gradual lifting of travel restrictions

Coronavirus: Commission recommends partial and gradual lifting of travel restrictions to the EU after 30 June, based on common coordinated approach

Today the Commission recommends to Schengen Member States and Schengen Associated States to lift internal border controls by 15 June 2020 and to prolong the temporary restriction on non-essential travel into the EU until 30 June 2020; and sets out an approach to progressively lifting the restriction afterwards.

Given that the health situation in certain third countries remains critical, the Commission does not propose a general lifting of the travel restriction at this stage. The restriction should be lifted for countries selected together by Member States, based on a set of principles and objective criteria including the health situation, the ability to apply containment measures during travel, and reciprocity considerations, taking into account data from relevant sources such as ECDC and WHO.

Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, said: “Following the lifting of all internal border checks inside the Union, we are proposing a clear and flexible approach towards removing restrictions on travel to the EU starting on 1 July. International travel is key for tourism and business, and for family and friends reconnecting. While we will all have to remain careful, the time has come to make concrete preparations for lifting restrictions with countries whose health situation is similar to the EU's and for resuming visa operations.”

Gradually removing restrictions on travel to the EU

Actions at the EU's external borders must be coordinated and uniform to be effective. As travellers entering the EU can move freely from one country to another, it is crucial that Member States coordinate their decisions on lifting travel restrictions. This is why Member States should agree on a common list of non-EU countries for which travel restrictions can be lifted as of 01 July, to be reviewed on a regular basis. To this end, the Commission proposes:

▪ Objective criteria: The decision to lift restrictions for a specific country should be based on the epidemiological situation and coronavirus response in that country, the ability to apply containment measures during travel, and whether or not that country has lifted travel restrictions towards the EU. Restrictions should be lifted first with countries whose epidemiological situation is similar to the EU average and where sufficient capabilities to deal with the virus are in place. Restrictions should remain in place for countries whose situation is worse than in the EU. The Commission proposes a detailed checklist to help Member States reach a common assessment. Decisions on lifting travel restrictions would concern non-EU nationals residing in a specific country (not its nationals).
▪ Common and coordinated approach: The Commission proposes a coordination mechanism whereby it would support Member States and Schengen Associated States at technical level and facilitate the preparation of a list of countries for which travel restrictions could be lifted. Decisions on lifting restrictions should then be prepared with Member States under the EU's integrated political crisis response mechanism. Member States should adopt such decisions in a coordinated manner and ensure uniform application across the EU. This will be a dynamic process and the integrated political crisis response mechanism would need to coordinate further updates.
▪ Flexibility: It will be possible to reintroduce travel restrictions for a specific country if the criteria are no longer met. In addition, Member States can still refuse entry to a non-EU traveller presenting a threat to public health, even coming from a country for which restrictions were lifted.

Where the travel restrictions continue to apply, Member States should ensure that those travelling to study are exempted, together with highly skilled non-EU workers if their employment is necessary from an economic perspective and the work cannot be postponed or performed abroad. EU citizens and citizens of Schengen Associated States and non-EU nationals legally residing in the EU, as well as their family members, should also be exempt from the travel restriction regardless of whether or not they are returning home, as was the case until now.

In the roadmap on lifting containment measures presented on 15 April, the Commission indicated that travel restrictions within the EU would need to start being lifted gradually before restrictions at the external borders can be relaxed in a second stage. This is now well under way, with several Member States having already lifted restrictions within the EU and others planning to do so as of 15 June 2020.

For More Information
▪ Communication on the third assessment of the application of the temporary restriction on non-essential travel to the EU, 11 June 2020
▪ Checklist to be used for the possible lifting of the temporary restriction on non-essential travel to the EU, 11 June 2020
▪ Guidance for a phased and coordinated resumption of visa operations, 11 June 2020

For full press release visit:

Source: European Union | European Commission | Press release | 11 June 2020 | Brussels | https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_20_1035

CROATIA - 18 June 2020

18 June 2020 - CNTB Website | Croatia welcomes tourists back

For questions specifically related to travel to Croatia not addressed by the Q&A please contact mintcz@mint.hr and Cc info@htz.hr.

Questions regarding crossing the border of Republic of Croatia: https://mup.gov.hr/uzg-covid/english/286212

Questions regarding filling entercroatia online form: entercroatia@mint.hr

Questions regarding epidemiological measures, economic measures and legal framework in Republic of Croatia during COVID-19 pandemic: mintcz@mint.hr

Additional information may be found here with additional information specific to travel Q&A available here*.

For additional information, the EU has launched ‘Re-open EU’, an interactive tool which aims to support a safe relaunch of travelling and tourism across Europe.

*Please note, all external links provided are not updated by the CNTB and the CNTB cannot be held accountable for their accuracy.

Below you can find the latest measures regarding travel to the Republic of Croatia.

Is it safe to travel to Croatia?
Croatia is open to tourists. The requirements may slightly differ depending on your country of origin, but EU/EEA Member States have the freedom to enter with a valid reservation, or if you are from one of 10 countries where restrictions have currently been lifted, border crossing is no longer subject to additional requirements.

The current border regulations will remain in effect in alignment with the Civil Protection Directorate decision published June 15th.

More information is provided below.

Croatian Citizens
Croatian citizens are allowed to return to the Republic of Croatia without any additional requirements or special measures.

EnterCroatia
The EnterCroatia online form allows visitors to enter all the necessary information and data prior to traveling to Croatia to ease border crossing upon entry.

EnterCroatia may be accessed here: https://entercroatia.mup.hr/

For those entering Croatia from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Republic of Austria, Republic of Estonia, Republic of Latvia, Republic of Lithuania, Republic of Poland, Republic of Slovenia, Federal Republic of Germany and Slovak Republic, the form is used to speed up border crossing, whereas other visitors entering the country in addition to filling out the form, still require one of the valid reasons listed below and must provide proof of reason for the visit (business, economic, touristic or personal reason). For a touristic visit, it is necessary to present the confirmation of accommodation booking in an accommodation establishment in Croatia (confirmation, voucher, camp lease contract, permanent berth contract etc.).

The online form includes all data normally requested in the process of crossing the border and with the simple presentation of a passport or identity document to a police officer at the border, the number or code from the identity card or passport is automatically linked to all pre-entered data. In this way, the time to complete the entire procedure of data entry at the border for each individual person in any given vehicle is reduced to a minimum and traffic flow is increased.

All visitors who fill out the online form will receive email instructions that will include epidemiological guidelines and information that are currently in place for visitors to Croatia.

At the moment the page is available in eleven languages including English, Croatian, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Slovenian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovak and Czech.

Please note that for organized travel via bus, the forms can be filled out in advance by the agency organizing the travel, whereas individuals traveling on regularly scheduled bus routes are required to complete the form individually.

The form is also available in a mobile-responsive format that may be accessed via the same link and completed on a mobile device. Should there be any issues or questions with regard to the form, please contact: entercroatia@mint.hr

 

Entry into the Republic of Croatia for foreign citizens:

I am a citizen of a Member State of the EU/EEA and I have booked tourist accommodation in the Republic of Croatia. What documents do I need to have to enter the Republic of Croatia?

It is necessary to present the confirmation of accommodation booking in an accommodation establishment.

The confirmation of accommodation booking in an accommodation establishment includes:
▪ Confirmation of accommodation booking of all accommodation service providers / all types of accommodation
▪ Camp lease contract
▪ Permanent berth contract in a nautical tourism port
▪ Confirmation of berth reservation in a nautical tourism port
▪ Travel agency voucher etc

Further information may be found here and additional Q&A here and additional announcements will be made available in accordance with any newly published Civil Protection Directorate decisions.

Croatia continues to have minimal Covid-19 cases and almost no new cases have been recorded over the last few weeks.

On May 13th the European Commission announced plans to enable freedom of movement across borders where the epidemiological criteria are similar and citizens can safely cross borders, while continuing to respect health and safety protocols, as well as any social distancing measures in place. Further information on the EC guidelines and recommendations may be found here.

Effective May 28th, the Civil Protection Directorate passed an amendment regarding the temporary ban on crossing the border crossings of the Republic of Croatia.

This Decision specifies that the following Member States of the European Union (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Republic of Austria, Republic of Estonia, Republic of Latvia, Republic of Lithuania, Republic of Poland, Republic of Slovenia, Federal Republic of Germany and Slovak Republic) will not be restricted to any of the above categories of entry, but will be able to enter under the same conditions as before the outbreak of COVID-19, but will still be subject to epidemiological control, and with the obligation to comply with general and special recommendations of the Croatian Institute of Public Health.

When citizens of the above Member States enter the Republic of Croatia, their entry will be recorded with the collection of additional data (place of destination, mobile phone number and e-mail address), due to the possible need for contact for epidemiological reasons.

Citizens from other EU countries may still enter Croatia, but will still have to prove their reason for entering the country (business, economic, touristic or personal reason). For a touristic visit, it is necessary to present the confirmation of accommodation booking in an accommodation establishment in Croatia (confirmation, voucher, camp lease contract, permanent berth contract etc.). Additional information about border crossing can be found here.

For other foreign nationals who intend to cross the state the border, they must meet one of the following conditions:

1. Possess documentation proving the ownership of real estate located in the Republic of Croatia or a marine vessel (boat, yacht, etc) - (may also be the holder of a lease), or is travelling to attend a funeral in the Republic of Croatia (and possesses appropriate documentation proving this). If any of these conditions are met, these foreign citizens are allowed to cross the state border, are registered and the place / address where they will stay or where the property / vessel is located will be recorded, along with the contact phone number and time of stay – including the date they plan to leave the Republic of Croatia.
2. They have documentation proving the invitation by a business registered in the Republic of Croatia, the reason the business requires their visit to the Republic of Croatia, or an invitation to a business meeting. For these passengers crossing the border, it is necessary to enter the place / address where they will stay and the contact phone number and the duration of the stay – including the date they plan to leave the Republic of Croatia.
3. All other foreign citizens who have a business reason, which cannot be foreseen at this time, and do not have the appropriate documentation, are instructed to send their intention to cross the state border (entry into the Republic of Croatia) to uzg.covid@mup.hr and their request will be addressed in the shortest possible timeframe. In addition an online form in lieu of email and Q&A related to this and the above is available  here.

Overall safety and hygiene measures, as well as social distancing are to be respected as required: The latest Covid-19 information and accompanying measures may be found here: https://www.koronavirus.hr/en and additional visitor information may be found here.

Are the borders open?

Currently, as mentioned above, borders are open in line with the above-mentioned requirements.

Any travellers or citizens that are allowed entry or return to Croatia at this time are required to adhere to the recommendations of the Croatia Institute of Public Health. With the number of active Covid-19 cases at a minimum, new measures are taken frequently and we expect further changes to border openings and protocols after June 30th. Prior to making plans, please contact your local consulate or embassy for the latest travel information and consult your home country’s travel advisories for exit and re-entry requirements, to ensure that your travel falls within current guidelines.

Is proof of a negative Covid test required for entry?
No, Croatia does not require Covid testing, nor proof of a negative test to enter.

Are there flights to Croatia?
Flights to and from Croatia are increasing weekly throughout June. Croatia Airlines maintains flights from Zagreb to and/from most major cities throughout Europe. For more information on Croatia Airlines flights, please check their website.

Many other commercial airlines have updated flight schedules and have begun or are soon to begin flights to and from Croatia.  Please check their websites for flights to various Croatian cities for June and/or July start dates (depending on the airline). If you already have tickets for upcoming travel and/or have a question regarding travel with a specific airline, it is best to contact the airline directly as most are updating their flight schedules on a week by week basis. Should you be unable to use your current flight ticket we recommend postponing your travel to a later date.

Please find a list of airline websites below*:

www.aerlingus.com
www.austrian.com
www.swiss.com
www.britishairways.com
www.lufthansa.com
www.easyjet.com
www.ryanair.com
www.klm.com
www.turkishairlines.com
www.emirates.com
www.airfrance.com
www.eurowings.com
www.airserbia.com
www.iberia.com
www.qatarairways.com
www.airtransat.com
www.aeroflot.ru
www.lot.com
www.wizzair.com
www.volotea.com
www.vueling.com
www.transavia.com
www.brusselsairlines.com
www.luxair.lu
www.aegeanair.com

*the above list is not exhaustive and may be added to or removed from as information becomes available; some of the aforementioned airlines may not have announced exact flight dates and it is best to check directly with the airline for flight schedules, whereas others may or may not have announced the resumption of flights to Croatia.

Are there any domestic flights operating within Croatia?
Domestic flights are operating and flights between Zagreb and Split, as well as Zagreb and Dubrovnik, along with flights from Zagreb to Pula and Zadar are available. These flights are operated by Croatia Airlines and more information may be found here.

Are hotels currently operation in Croatia and if not, when are hotels, camps, private accommodation and other expected to reopen?
A large number of hotels, camps, private accommodation and other accommodation facilities have resumed operations in Croatia, with many continuing to reopen as we approach July. Please check with the hotel, camp or accommodation provider directly for details on timing. Please note, all accommodation facilities are required to prescribe to the recommended health and safety procedures that may be found here.

Are restaurants open?
Restaurants and cafes have been open and operational since early May, and are also allowed to provide outdoor seating and service, provided they have implemented prescribed health and safety measures.

Are beaches, parks and outdoor recreational facilities open?
Parks and public recreational facilities (including pools, aquaparks and thermal spas) have reopened, however health and safety measures, as well as social distancing guidelines still apply. Beaches are open for public use, again keeping in mind that health and safety, as well as any social distancing measures in effect at the time will apply. The Zagreb Zoo reopened to the public and National Parks and Nature Parks reopened May 11th, and continue to adhere to the prescribed and applicable health and safety measures.

Are events and public gatherings allowed?
Effective May 27th the 40-person limit on events and public gatherings was lifted, larger gatherings are allowed, including weddings, night-clubs, conferences and the like. All organized events and public gatherings are subject to the guidelines and recommendations outlined by the Croatian Institute of Public Health. Further details will be made available on the CIPH website in due course. More information can be found here (currently available in Croatian only).

Effective June 15th sport events (matches, tournaments, etc.) are now open to the public, but will be subject to the recommendations and measures outlined by the Civil Protection Directorate.

Are private boats allowed to enter Croatian waters and or mooring in Croatia? What is the situation with nautical tourism?
The sea border is also open for private vessels effective June 12th under the same conditions as land borders. The Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure will provide guidelines on their  website. Please be sure to fill out the enclosed PDF prior to travel.

Is there public transportation available within Croatia? Within and/or to and from various cities and regions. What about international train and bus service?
Public transportation is readily available throughout Croatia. For schedules and information on reinstated routes it is best to check with the local bus stations. Contact information for major stations may be found here.

Croatian domestic rail service is also available. Routes, timetables and availability may be found here.

Meanwhile, organized international bus service (charter and regular bus lines), as well as rail service, are now increasing in availability with many routes being reinstated from mid-June. For ease of travel please see the EnterCroatia information and ensure you or the agency you are travelling with has filled out your details in advance to ensure a quick and efficient border crossing. Contact information for major stations may be found here.

Is there passenger traffic and/or public ferry transport available to and from the Croatian islands?
Travel to and from all Croatian islands is available from the mainland and between islands where such a service exists.

For information on ferry lines operated by Jadrolinija please check here.

Information on additional ferry and catamaran lines to and from Croatia and/or to and from Croatian islands from the mainland may also be found via:

Krilo
Rapska Plovidba
Split Express**
SNAV*
Venezia Lines*
Adriatic Lines*
Trieste Lines*

*As with airlines, this list may not be exhaustive and the timetables and start of service is dependent upon the individual company. Please check directly with the service provider in order to ensure accuracy, as timetables and service may change at any time.

Additional Information
Various recommendations and guidelines for the tourism sector may be found here or via the Croatian Institute of Public Health here.

Transiting through Croatia
If you are travelling through Croatia to another country, please note that there are specific guidelines in place regarding this. Travel is limited to the main highways and stops are limited. All transiting passengers are instructed to follow the guidance provided by the border control officers. A map of approved roadways may be found here (currently only in Croatian).

What in case I get infected by Covid-19?
In case you identify any symptoms that are similar to the mild flu-like symptoms, such as: fever, cough, shortness of breath, muscle pain and fatigue, or you had a close contact with a confirmed or suspected case of coronavirus infection, immediately call your doctor or epidemiological service. Describe your symptoms and follow their advice. We suggest calling by phone before going to the doctor's office.

Does my healthcare insurance cover any Covid-related health services in Croatia?
If you are an EU or Swiss national and are covered by your country’s national health insurance provider, your coverage will cover any Covid-related services should they be required in Croatia just as they would be in their home country.

Nationals of other countries should check their health insurance coverage prior to travel to ensure they are covered in case of emergency health services that include any Covid-related health services.

Source: Croatian Tourist Board | Updated 18 June 2020 | Coronavirus-2019 Q&A

 

28 May 2020 - EnterCroatia website open

The Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Tourism have opened the website https://entercroatia.mup.hr/ in order to increase the efficiency of crossing the border of the Republic of Croatia and to make our guests aware of the epidemiological measures in force in Croatia.

On this page there is an online form in which all data normally requested in the process of crossing the border are entered and with a simple presentation of a passport or identity document to a police officer at the border, the number or code from the identity card or passport is automatically linked to all pre-entered data in the online form. In this way, the entire procedure of entering the data of each individual person in the vehicle is reduced to a minimum time and traffic flow is increased.

"This Government is continuously considering all possibilities to create a balance between economic and health security, and at the same time make the entire system in which we connect the segments of tourism, transport and health as efficient as possible. This innovative solution will enable the accelerated entry of tourists into Croatia, where we ensure all security protocols and communication with our guests. Croatia is recognized as a country with a highly efficient preparedness system and a favourable epidemiological picture, and in terms of tourism it is an opportunity to prove ourselves once again as a destination that emphasizes security and innovation" - said Minister Cappelli on the occasion of the 'EnterCroatia' project.

"After the excellent epidemiological situation in Croatia and after the opening of borders by creating this special website, we have created all the necessary preconditions for a quick, efficient and safe arrival of tourists in Croatia. We believe that our new promotional campaign 'The Vacation You Deserve Is Closer Than You Think', which was launched in markets in the region such as Austria, Hungary, Slovenia, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Germany, Italy and Poland, will achieve good results and that citizens of these countries will soon be visiting in increasing numbers" - said the Director of the CNTB, Kristjan Staničić, adding that an online platform 'EnjoyTheViewFromCroatia' has been created for promotion in markets that mostly depend on air transport connections such as Great Britain, France, Scandinavia, but also distant markets such as China, USA and South Korea.

At the same time, all those who fill in their data online will be sent to their email address, instructions containing epidemiological information and measures in force in the Republic of Croatia for their safe stay in Croatia.

At the moment, the website has a form available in Croatian and English, and over the next few days it will be available in many other languages ​​and passengers will receive instructions in the same languages ​​(eg German, Slovenian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish etc), ie everything will be available in more than 10 different languages.

Source: Republic of Croatia Ministry of Tourism | Updated 28 May 2020 | EnterCroatia website open

 

27 May 2020 - Tourist Purpose Visit to Croatia - Proof of Travel Arrangements

Example of confirmation of accommodation reservation / charter services / etc proving entry into the Republic of Croatia for tourist purposes

Note: It can be printed in the form of a document or e-mail and it is necessary to have it when entering the Republic of Croatia, and it should contain the following information:

Information about the service provider:

▪ Name and surname of the owner of the accommodation provider / company name
▪ Address of the accommodation / company 
▪ Type of service (example - accommodation service)
▪ Information about the service and the recipient of services
▪ Name and surname of the customer
▪ Number of persons for which the service is purchased (example - 4) 
▪ Period for which the service was purchased (date from / to) (example - 01.06.2020 - 15.06.2020)

Source:  Republic of Croatia Ministry of Tourism | Written News | Updated 27 May 2020 | Example of confirmation of accommodation reservation / charter services / etc



22 May 2020 - Cappelli: Croatia to have controlled tourism

In the coming period Croatia will have a controlled tourism and by filling out an online application visitors will be able to cross the border in a few seconds, without having to wait, Tourism Minister Gari Cappelli told a news conference on Friday.

"Guests will not have to wait at the border but will be able to cross it in a few seconds by filling out an online application in advance. By 28 May we will have the application based on the platform that was previously used to issue movement permits" - said Cappelli.

He stressed that hotels were being reopened, depending on capacity and the number of arrivals and that instructions had been prepared for guests in English on how to behave during their stay.

The minister said that part of the tourists who had previously cancelled bookings for Croatia were again making bookings for June and that Germany had expressed a wish, in agreement with other EU countries, to allow cross-border travel for its nationals for the purpose of vacationing as of 15 June. The same date applies to Poland as well, he said.

"As for third countries, the situation will depend on an agreement at EU level. We are trying to follow the protocol agreed at EU level, as well as bilateral agreements, such as the one with Slovenia" - said Cappelli.

Croatia is monitoring the situation at border crossings and entries of tourists into the county will be monitored by epidemiologists and the Croatian Public Health Institute (HZJZ), Interior Minister and head of the coronavirus crisis response team Davor Božinović said.

"We are monitoring the situation at border crossings. It is important to understand that entry into Croatia, particularly for tourism purposes, will be monitored by our epidemiological services and HZJZ. It is important to protect the health of citizens and our guests and respond if need be" - Božinović said.

Speaking about the situation at border crossings, Božinović underlined that an online questionnaire has been made available as of Thursday that explains the conditions for entry into Croatia which until now were not available via e-mail. He added that border police were resolving up to 90% of inquiries via that application.

Božinović said that the application was voluntary and would enable tourists to meet conditions to enter Croatia in advance.

He said that by the end of May the border would be opened for Austrians, Slovaks, Czechs and Hungarians. He also said that as of midnight Thursday until 1.00pm on Friday 5,336 foreign citizens had entered Croatia, mostly from Slovenia.

Source: Republic of Croatia Ministry of Tourism | Hina | Updated 22 May 2020 | Croatia to have controlled tourism



18 May 2020 - Recommendations and instructions of the Croatian Institute of Public Health for Croatian and foreign nationals who are crossing the state border and entering the Republic of Croatia

What to expect when you cross Croatian border?
The Decision on the Temporary Ban of Transit through Border Crossings of the Republic of Croatia (“Official Gazette” number 32/20 and 48/20), and the Decision on the Amendment of the aforementioned Decision from 09 May 2020, allows:

▪ Croatian citizens to enter into Republic of Croatia and go abroad. 

▪ The return to the country of residence for citizens of EU Member Countries, namely citizens of Schengen Countries and Schengen Associated Countries as well as their family members, and third-country nationals who are long-term residents pursuant to the Council Directive 2003/109/EC of 25 November 2003 concerning the status of third-country nationals who are long-term residents and persons who have the right of residence on the basis of other EU Directives or national law or who have national long-term visas, and entry into the Republic of Croatia under special conditions.

▪ The same decision also prescribes exceptions for the application of abovementioned provisions, and they apply to the following:
- healthcare professionals, healthcare researchers and associates, senior care professionals, and those requiring urgent medical treatment
- cross-border workers
- freight carriers and other transport personnel to the extent necessary
- diplomats, police officers in the performance of their duties, civil protection services and teams, personnel of international organizations and international military personnel in the performance of their functions
- transit passengers, and for:
- persons who have a business reason or who have some other economic interest
- persons who are traveling due to urgent personal reasons (ie they own real estate in the Republic of Croatia or who have some other urgent personal reason)

Entry into the Republic of Croatia for Croatian citizens
The self-isolation measure in the duration of 14 days from article II. of the Decision is no longer implemented for Croatian citizens, instead upon entry into the Republic of Croatia they are given a leaflet by the border police in which they are notified that they are obligated to adhere to general and special recommendations and instructions by the Croatian Institute of Public Health, which recommend that they should limit their interaction with other persons from their area and only carry out the most urgent tasks outside of their homes during the 14-day period from the date they entered into the Republic of Croatia. The abovementioned also applies to foreign nationals who are allowed entry into the Republic of Croatia under special conditions.

Entry into the Republic of Croatia for foreign nationals
If the foreign national intends to cross the state border he has to meet one of the following conditions:

▪ Possesses documentation with which he can prove ownership of real estate located in the Republic of Croatia, or vessel (lessee is also permitted), or is attending a funeral in the Republic of Croatia (possesses appropriate documentation which proves this). After meeting the conditions, such foreign nationals are allowed to cross the state border, they are registered and the location/address where they will stay, or where the real estate/vessel is located, is entered as well as the contact telephone number and duration of stay-when they plan leaving the Republic of Croatia.

▪ They possess documentation with which they prove that they were invited to the Republic of Croatia by an economic operator, the economic operator’s interest for them to enter into Republic of Croatia, or a business meeting invite. For these passengers, it is necessary to enter the place / address where they will stay and the contact phone number and duration of stay - when they plan to leave the Republic of Croatia.

All other foreign nationals who have a certain business reason, which cannot be foreseen at this time, and do not have the appropriate documentation, should be instructed to announce their intention to cross the state border (enter into the Republic of Croatia) at uzg.covid@mup.hr and they will receive an answer as soon as possible.

Epidemiological measures
All of the abovementioned Croatian and foreign nationals have to be instructed regarding the epidemiological measures that they are obliged to adhere to, and they are as follows:

▪ Persons from these categories are obligated to reduce contact with other persons to a minimum and adhere to instructions on reducing the risk of disease transmission (avoid physical contact, maintain a distance of at least 1.5m during face-to-face contact; wash or disinfect hands often

▪ Avoid touching your face, and it is recommended that they wear a face mask or surgical mask indoors, or outside of their home or accommodation. During the 14-day period from the date of entry into the Republic of Croatia, the persons measure their body temperature during the morning hours and if the body temperature reading is higher than 37.2 °C, if the person feels sick or has any signs of the disease, he should contact the chosen family physician, if he has one, or a territorially competent epidemiologist. The property owner or his representative or host, ie the organizer of their arrival, may assist the foreign nationals in contacting the epidemiological service.

▪ Occurrence of symptoms of the disease during the stay in the Republic of Croatia. If the persons cross the state border and develop symptoms of the disease after entering into the Republic of Croatia, they will stay in their accommodation and contact their host, ie organizer of their arrival, via telephone, who will notify the epidemiologist on standby or the competent primary healthcare physician. Outside of the working hours of the competent primary healthcare physician, the host of the foreign (official) person, who is exhibiting pronounced symptoms of the disease, calls the emergency medical services or contacts the closest COVID infirmary via telephone.

Entry into the Republic of Croatia for persons exhibiting signs of the disease
If a person is exhibiting signs of the disease when entering the Republic of Croatia, the border police shall inform the border sanitary inspector and / or the sanitary inspector of the Regional or Central Office of the State Inspectorate. Such persons are recommended not to enter the Republic of Croatia, and if they have to cross the state border due to urgent reasons, they are sent to the competent health institution for testing and treatment by the shortest possible route, that is, they are sent to be tested and undergo isolation.

Recommendation not to travel
Persons who have an elevated body temperature and/or acute respiratory infection symptoms should postpone their trip to the Republic of Croatia. Before traveling, foreign nationals are advised to measure their morning body temperature. If the person’s body temperature, which was measured in the morning hours, is higher than 37.2 °C, if the person feels sick or is exhibiting any signs of the disease (relates to all symptoms and signs of the diseases, not just respiratory diseases), it is recommended that that person should not travel.

Recommendations and instructions by the Croatian Institute of Public Health
Croatian and foreign nationals who are entering the Republic of Croatia are obligated to adhere to these instructions for a duration of 14 days from the date of crossing the border, in the following manner:

▪ During the first 14 days after entering the Republic of Croatia, leaving the accommodation is limited to the following: for work, if the entry into the Republic of Croatia was due to business reasons, performing necessary activities while continuously adhering to hygienic measures.

▪ When leaving the accommodation due to necessary reasons, it is recommended to use a face mask or a nose and mouth cover, maintain physical distance from other people (no less than 1.5m) and maintain hand hygiene.

▪ Wash hands as often as possible with warm water and soap, and/or use hand disinfectant which should be thoroughly rubbed between the palms. Avoid touching the face, mouth, nose and eyes.

▪ Avoid using public transportation. In a means of transport, it is preferable for the person to be alone or exclusively with persons who are sharing the accommodation.

▪ Consistently avoid groups and public gatherings.

▪ Meet as few people as possible during business meetings, ensure a physical distance of 1.5 meters with disinfectant being readily available, avoid unnecessary meetings.

▪ During their stay at the accommodation, such persons prepare their own food, or use food and beverage delivery services.

▪ Payment is done by contactless payment or through on-line services.

▪ The body temperature has to be measured each morning, if it is higher than 37.2 C° it has to be measured again after 10 minutes, and if it is still higher than 37.2 C°, they should stay at home/accommodation and notify the chosen family physician, if they have one (Croatian citizens), or the territorially competent epidemiologist.

▪ In the event that symptoms of acute respiratory infection occur (cough, sore throat, elevated body temperature, shortness of breath/trouble breathing, loss of smell and taste) it is necessary to stay at home/accommodation and notify the chosen family physician, if they have one (Croatian citizens), or the territorially competent epidemiologist.

▪ In the event that severe, life-threatening symptoms suddenly occur, the person should contact the urgent medical services. If symptoms of respiratory disease occur (elevated body temperature, cough, shortness of breath, trouble breathing, sore throat, weakness) call your chosen physician, who will evaluate the need for testing for the novel coronavirus on the basis of your health condition. If you require medical assistance for reasons other than respiratory diseases, call your chosen physician or have one of your household members contact him for a consultation and to arrange a house visit. Do not go to a healthcare facility alone without notifying them over the telephone beforehand. You can read more information about the coronavirus disease and measures for reducing the risk of spreading the disease on the CIPH website, as well as from your chosen doctor and territorially competent epidemiologist.

Recommendations and instructions on English are available here.

Source: Koronavirus.hr | Updated 18 May 2020 | KORONAVIRUS.HR

 

14 May 2020 - Information regarding entering Croatia for non-Croatian citizens

Recommendations & instructions of the Croatian Institute of Public Health
Croatian and foreign nationals entering the Republic of Croatia must comply with these recommendations and instructions in the period of 14 days following their crossing of the state border, as follows:

▪ During the first 14 days following the entry into the Republic of Croatia, accommodation may be left only in absolutely necessary situations: carrying out business activities if business was the purpose of entry into the Republic of Croatia, carrying out necessary activities with continuous increased hygiene measures in place.

▪ When leaving accommodation in absolutely necessary situations, it is recommended to wear a mask or a covering for the nose and mouth, to keep a physical distance from others (a minimum of 1.5 metres) and to practice hand hygiene.

▪ Hands should be washed as often as possible with warm water and soap and/or a hand disinfectant should be used that needs to be well rubbed on the palms. Touching one’s face, mouth, nose and eyes should be avoided.

▪ Using public transport should be avoided. In the means of transport, a person should preferably be alone or exclusively with persons with whom he/she shares accommodation.

▪ Grouping and public gatherings should be consistently avoided.

▪ During business meetings, it is necessary to meet with as few persons as possible, to ensure a physical distance of 1.5 metres and availability of disinfectants, to avoid unnecessary meetings.

▪ During their stay in the accommodation, the persons concerned prepare the food themselves or use food and beverage delivery services.

▪ Payments are made by using non-cash card payments or online services.

▪ Body temperature should be measured every morning. If it exceeds 37.2 degrees, it should be taken again after 10 minutes. If the temperature again exceeds 37.2 degrees, the person should stay at home/one’s accommodation and contact the chosen general practitioner, if any (Croatian nationals), or a competent local epidemiologist.

▪ In case of any symptoms of acute respiratory infection (cough, sore throat, high temperature, short breath/difficulty in breathing, loss of smell and taste), it is necessary to stay at home/your accommodation and contact the chosen general practitioner, if any (Croatian nationals), or a competent local epidemiologist.

▪ In case of sudden onset of severe, life-threatening symptoms, the person should contact the emergency medical services.

▪ In case of respiratory disease symptoms. If you develop respiratory disease symptoms (high temperature, cough, shortness of breath, difficulty in breathing, sore throat, weakness), you should contact your chosen doctor by phone who will, based on your medical condition, assess the need for you to be tested for the new coronavirus. If you require medical assistance for reasons other than a respiratory disease, you should phone your chosen doctor or one of the members of your household can contact the doctor for consultations and arranging a house call. Do not visit healthcare facilities without having previously contacted them by phone. You can find more information on the coronavirus disease and measures for reducing the risk of spreading the disease on the website of the Croatian Institute of Public Health, or from your chosen general practitioner and a competent local epidemiologist.

Croatian and foreign nationals may request additional information and clarifications by calling 112 or 113.

Source: Koronavirus.hr | Updated 14 May 2020 | KORONAVIRUS.HR

 

23 Apr 2020 - Croatian Government to relax lockdown measures in three steps

Zagreb, 23 April 2020 (Hina) - On Thursday, The Croatian Government has accepted a decision on measures to re-launch economic and other activities in the face of the declared epidemic of the COVID-19 disease, which stipulates the gradual loosening of the measures introduced, starting on Monday 27 April, and further on 04 and 11 May 2020.

In the first phase, which starts on 27 April, all retail stores will be able to re-open, except for those operating in shopping centres. Stores that already had permission to operate in shopping centres during lockdown measures, will continue to be able to operate.

Other businesses in trade sector will be able to operate with physical distancing measures, except those businesses in which close contact with clients cannot be avoided. These are businesses such as tailors, key makers, carpenters, travel agencies etc.

As of Monday, public city and suburban transport lines, and high-speed catamaran lines are being re-introduced for islands not connected by ferry lines. Libraries, museums, galleries, antiques and bookstores are also able to re-open.

Training can recommence for first and second category athletes in individual sports and senior sports teams that compete in the highest level of competition.

The second phase would follow on 04 May, providing the first phase was successful and the epidemiological situation did not worsen. It would allow a full-scale public health system and private health practices to resume operating as normal, except those subject to specific measures by the Ministry of Health.

Businesses engaged in activities with close contact with clients, such as beauticians, barbers and hairdressers, would be allowed to re-open with special measures.

The third phase is scheduled for 11 May, which would allow the gatherings of up to ten people while respecting physical distancing measures, and would also allow the operation of shopping centres, as well as the operation of kindergartens and elementary schools from grades 1-4 and classes for children with special needs and disabilities. Students could take practical laboratory, artistic and clinical exercises, working in small groups.

Inter-city public transport lines and domestic air services would be re-introduced from 11 May, and restaurant services could be provided exclusively in outdoor areas and terraces, with due regard for epidemiological measures.

The hospitality sector in accommodation capacities only would be able to resume and National and Nature Parks would be allowed to re-open.

All three phases presuppose the application and adherence to measures of physical distancing and the highest hygiene and disinfection standards.

Employers are still under obligation to provide working conditions according to epidemiological measures and, wherever possible from home, organising virtual meetings and banning employees with fever and respiratory symptoms from coming to work.

The ban on holding public events and large gatherings continues.

Source: ​Hina​. (2020). VLADA Popuštanje mjera u tri koraka [Government relaxing the measures in three steps]. https://www.hina.hr/vijest/10347802

 

Zagreb, 18 April 2020 - Decision on amendment of the temporary restriction of crossing the border of the Republic of Croatia

The decision on temporary restriction of the crossing of the border of the Republic of Croatia has been extended to 18 May 2020.

Croatian citizens will be allowed to return to the Republic of Croatia, that is, to go to the country in which they work and reside, following the instructions and measures of the Croatian Institute of Public Health.

Return to the countries of origin will be granted to nationals of Member States of the European Union, ie Member States of the Schengen Area and countries associated with the Schengen Area as well as members of their families, and third-country nationals who are long-term residents under Council Directive 200/109/EC of 25 November 2003 on the status of long-term third-country nationals and persons entitled to stay under other EU directives or national law or holding national long-stay visas. Until the end of 2020, UK citizens will be treated in the same way as EU citizens.

The instructions and measures of the Croatian Institute of Public Health are compulsory for these persons. 

The exceptions to this Decision are:
▪ health professionals, health researchers and associate professionals in the care of the elderly and persons requiring urgent medical treatment
▪ cross-border workers
▪ freight carriers and other transport personnel to the extent necessary
▪ diplomats, police officers in the performance of their duties, civil protection services and teams, personnel of international organizations and international military personnel in the performance of their functions
▪ passengers in transit

The above exceptions are subject to the instructions and measures adopted by the Croatian Institute of Public Health. 

The measure came into force on 19 March 2020 and originally in effect until 18 April 2020, now extended to 18 May 2020.

Source: Koronavirus.hr - Republic of Croatia - Official Government Page for COVID-19 Information

 

Zagreb, 07 April 2020 - All short-term travel to Croatia to be avoided unless urgent!

Following the earlier call on Croatian nationals who temporarily or permanently live and work abroad to postpone all unnecessary travel to Croatia until further notice, the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, in agreement with the Civil Protection Headquarters, reiterates the importance of this appeal.

We advise that Croatian nationals stay in their place of residence to minimize exposure and reduce the risk of coronavirus infection for themselves, their families and those around them. It is recommended that all short-term travel to Croatia be avoided unless it is urgent!

All persons entering Croatia from abroad will be subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine or will be issued an order to self-isolate for 14 days. They will undergo the same procedure upon return to the countries they came from.

The Ministry also warns of frequent changes in other countries, including changes of rules concerning border crossing or air travel, which could make it difficult or impossible for Croatian nationals to return to the countries they live and work in.

Source: Republic of Croatia - Ministry of Foreign & European Affairs

 

Zagreb, 03 April 2020 - Postponement of unnecessary travel for Croats living, working abroad

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, in agreement with the Civil Protection Headquarters, calls on the Croatian nationals living, residing or working abroad to postpone all unnecessary travel to Croatia until further notice.

Citizens are advised to stay in their place of residence in order to reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19 and thus protect themselves, their families and everyone around them.

All those departing for Croatia with the intent of short-term stay should be aware that the situation in other countries is changing and that regulations regarding border crossing or air traffic are subject to change without prior notice, which can hinder or prevent their return altogether.

We would like to point out the epidemiological measures in place for all those that enter Croatia from other countries. Consequently, they will be informed about the obligatory 14-day quarantine or 14-day self-isolation.

Source: Republic of Croatia - Ministry of Foreign & European Affairs

 

Zagreb, 23 March 2020 - Coronavirus control strengthening measures for Croatian and foreign nationals entering the Republic of Croatia

The Civil Protection Headquarters of the Republic of Croatia, on 19 March 2020, adopted the Decision on the temporary ban on crossing the state border at the border crossings of the Republic of Croatia. To protect the population of the Republic of Croatia from COVID-19, persons are temporarily prohibited from or restricted in crossing the state border at all border crossings of the Republic of Croatia. This Decision entered into force on 19 March 2020 and shall be implemented for 30 days.

Croatian citizens will be allowed to return to Croatia or to go to a country where they work and live, implementing the instructions and measures of the Croatian Institute for Public Health (hereinafter: CIPH).

Return to their domicile states will be allowed to the citizens of the Member States of the European Union and the countries of the Schengen Area and the Schengen Associated States, and their family members, as well as the third-country nationals who are long-term residents under Council Directive 2003/109/EC of 25 November 2003 concerning the status of third-country nationals who are long-term residents, and persons deriving their right to reside from other EU Directives or national law or who hold national long-term visas. UK nationals are still to be treated in the same way as EU citizens until end of 2020.

The interest of the Republic of Croatia for the persons referred to in the preceding paragraph to enter the Republic of Croatia shall be confirmed by the heads of the respective ministries in accordance with the scope of their authorisation in exceptional cases. To such persons, the instructions and measures adopted by the CIPH shall apply.

The following persons shall be exempt from the implementation of this Decision:
▪ Healthcare professionals, healthcare researchers and collaborators, experts in care for the elderly, and persons requiring urgent medical treatment
▪ Cross-border workers
▪ Goods carriers and other transport personnel to the extent necessary
▪ Diplomats, police officers in the performance of their activities, Civil Defence services and teams, international organizations staff and International military personnel in carrying out their functions
▪ Passengers in transit

The above mentioned exempt persons shall be subject to the instructions and measures adopted by the CIPH.

The Croatian Civil Protection Headquarters on 16 March 2020 updated the package of measures for limiting the entry of disease into the population and strengthening control over the coronavirus spread.
 
All foreign nationals entering the Republic of Croatia from the following countries/territories:
▪ People's Republic of China: Hubei Province
▪ Italian Republic
▪ FR Germany: Heinsberg County in the German State of North Rhine-Westphalia
▪ Republic of Korea: Daegu City & Cheongdo Province
▪ Islamic Republic of Iran
▪ Republic of Slovenia: Bela Krajina & Dolenjska

will be informed about their compulsory 14-day quarantine, while all Croatian nationals will be issued a decision requiring them to go into a 14-day self-imposed isolation.

All foreign and Croatian nationals entering the Republic of Croatia from the following countries/territories:

Kingdom of Spain, French Republic, Federal Republic of Germany (except Heinsberg County in the German State of North Rhine-Westphalia), Swiss Confederation, Kingdom of Denmark, Kingdom of Sweden, Kingdom of Netherlands, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Republic of Austria, Kingdom of Belgium, Kingdom of Norway, Czech Republic, Republic of Finland, Hellenic Republic, Republic of Estonia, State of Israel, Russian Federation, Ireland, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Republic of San Marino, Republic of Moldova, Republic of Island, Republic of Slovenia, Republic of Albania, Republic of Poland, Romania, Portugese Republic, Slovak Republic, Hungary, Republic of Belarus, Republic of Bulgaria, Republic of North Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ukraine, Republic of Serbia, Montenegro, Republic of Cyprus, Republic of Lithuania, Republic of Latvia, Republic of Malta, People's Republic of China (except the Hubei province), Republic of Korea (except Daegu City and the Cheongdo Province), Japan, Republic of Singapore, Malaysia, Republic of Armenia, Republic of the Philippines, Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Brunei Darussalam, Kingdom of Cambodia, Mongolia, Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, Kingdom of Thailand, Republic of India, Republic of Indonesia, Republic of Maldives, Kingdom of Bahrein, State of Kuwait - United Arab Emirates, State of Qatar, Republic of Iraq, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Lebanese Republic, Peoples Republic of Bangladesh, Guam, Australia, New Zealand, United States of America, Canada, Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Jamaica, Republic of Costa Rica, Republic of Panama, Dominican Republic, Federal Republic of Brasil, Republic of Chile, Argentine Republic, Republic of Colombia, Republic of Peru, Republic of Ecuador, Republic of Paraguay, Republic of Guyana, Kingdom of Marocco, Republic of Tunisia, Arab Republic of Egypt, Peoples Democratic Republic of Algeria, Republic of South Africa, Republic of Senegal, Republic of Rwanda, Republic of Kenya, Republic of Cameroon

will be issued a decision requiring them to go into a 14-day self-imposed isolation.

The list will be updated in accordance with recommendations and the epidemiological situation.

Instructions are updated daily and published on the website: Croatian Institute of Public Health

Source: Republic of Croatia - Ministry of Foreign & European Affairs

 

IATA website - Latest update published on 16 June 2020

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
This does not apply to:
- nationals of Croatia and their family members.
- nationals of Austria, Czechia, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia.
- nationals of Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland when:
- returning via Croatia to their country of residence; or
- traveling on business with an invitation letter; or
- traveling as tourists with accommodation reservation confirmation.
- passengers with a British passport and their family members, when:
- returning via Croatia to their country of residence; or
- traveling on business with an invitation letter; or
- traveling as tourists with accommodation reservation confirmation.
- passengers with a long-term residence permit issued by Croatia.
- passengers with a long term residence permit or a long term "D" visa issued by Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom when:
- returning via Croatia to their country of residence; or
- traveling on business with an invitation letter; or
- traveling as tourists with accommodation reservation confirmation.
- passengers entering Croatia to transit by land to a third country. They must prove that they can enter the destination country.
2. Passports and national ID cards issued to nationals of Croatia which expired on 11 March 2020 or later are considered valid.

For updates check on the International Air Transport Association (IATA) website​.


ITALY - 04 June 2020

19 May 2020 - Italian nationals returning to Italy and foreigners in Italy

Download Forms
1. TO DECLARE MOVEMENTS IN ITALY: NEW SELF-CERTIFICATION FORM 04.05.2020 (courtesy translation EN)
2. TO DECLARE THE REASONS FOR TRAVELLING: THE SELF-CERTIFICATION FORM (courtesy translation EN)

1. Can I travel to and from abroad between 18 May and 02 June?
Between 18 May and 02 June there will be no changes in travel to and from abroad, which continues to be allowed only for proven work, urgent and health reasons; however, you may also travel to return to your home. If you are travelling to Italy from abroad you will be required to self-isolate, under the supervision of the competent health authorities, either at home or at any other address of your choice or, if you have no place to stay, at the accommodation arranged for you by the regional civil protection authorities.

Since 18 May, however, further exemptions from this rule have been introduced (see the relevant FAQ).

2. How will travel to and from abroad change from 03 June?
From 03 June, people will be allowed to travel freely from and to the following States:

▪ Member States of the European Union (besides Italy, the following are EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the Czech Republic)
▪ States party to the Schengen Agreement (non-EU States party to the Schengen Agreement are: Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland)
▪ United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
▪ Andorra, Principality of Monaco
▪ Republic of San Marino and Vatican City State

From 03 June, persons travelling to Italy from these countries will no longer be required to self-isolate under the supervision of the health authorities for 14 days, unless they have stayed in other countries during a 14-day period prior to entering Italy. For example, persons travelling to Italy from France on 14 June will be required to self-isolate only if they travelled to France from the United States, for example, on 04 June; however, they will not be required to self-isolate if they travelled to France from the United States prior to 30 May, or if they stayed in Germany between 31 May and 13 June. Between 03 and 15 June, the same rules applying until 02 June to travel to from abroad shall continue to apply to travel to and from States other than those listed above (see the previous FAQ).

3. I have travelled to Italy from abroad. Am I required to self-isolate?
As a rule, yes. Until 02 June all persons travelling to Italy from abroad are required to self-isolate for 14 days, under the supervision of the competent health authorities, either at home or at any other address of their choice, lacking which accommodation will be arranged by the regional civil protection authorities. However, there are exceptions to this rule (see the next FAQ).

4. Which are the exceptions to mandatory self-isolation when travelling to Italy from abroad?
Mandatory self-isolation does not apply to the following persons:

▪ transport crew members
▪ travel staff members
▪ persons travelling for proven work reasons, if citizens of or resident in one of the following countries: Italy, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
▪ health personnel travelling to Italy for professional purposes
▪ cross-border workers entering the country to work and then returning home
▪ employees of companies with their main or secondary headquarters in Italy, returning to the country after travelling abroad, for work, for no more than 72 hours (3 days), which period may be extended up to 120 hours (5 days), in exceptional circumstances
▪ travel to and from the Republic of San Marino and the Vatican City State
▪ officials and other servants of the European Union, international organisations, diplomatic missions and consulates
▪ students attending study programmes abroad and returning home at least once a week
▪ persons travelling to Italy for a short stay (72 hours, extendable for justified reasons up to 120 hours in total) for proven work, urgent or health reasons
▪ transit passengers
▪ persons travelling through the country for no more than 24 hours (extendable to 36 hours in total for justified reasons), to reach their country of residence (eg entering Italy by ferry from Greece to continue by car to their home in Germany)

From 03 June, besides the cases listed above, mandatory self-isolation will no longer be required for persons travelling to Italy from the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. However, mandatory self-isolation shall continue to be required if, during the 14-day period prior to entering Italy they had stayed for any length of time in a country other than those listed above. For example, persons travelling to Italy from France on 14 June will be required to self-isolate if they had travelled to France from the United States, for example, on 04 June, but will not be required to self-isolate if they travelled from the United States to France before 30 May, or if they stayed in Germany between 31 May and 13 June.

5. When am I required to start self-isolating after arriving in Italy?
As a rule, immediately after entering the country. You are only allowed to reach the address where you have chosen to self-isolate, by the shortest possible route and without using any means of public transport other than the means used to travel to Italy (for example, if you fly into Fiumicino Airport you are not allowed to catch a train into Rome or for any other destination). Transit passengers are not required to self-isolate: if you are on a short stopover between flights and do not leave the airport you are free to board a connecting flight to any other domestic or international destination. Furthermore, if you are travelling to Italy from abroad for proven work, urgent or health reasons, you may delay the start of self-isolation for 72 hours (or, in exceptional circumstances, 120 hours in total). The delay must be justified by the same reasons that justified your travel to Italy in the first place. For the cases of exemption from mandatory self-isolation see the previous FAQ.

6. I am a foreign resident and need to pass through Italy to go home. What am I required to do?
Transit through Italy, from one foreign country to another, to return home along the fastest possible route and without intermediate stopovers that are not strictly necessary, is allowed, if you are travelling for work, urgent and health reasons. For example:

▪ airport transits are allowed (for example, if travelling from Caracas to Frankfurt, with a stopover in Fiumicino), as long as you do not leave the airport
▪ cruise passengers disembarking in Italy at the end of the cruise are allowed to return to the country where they live (at the expense of the ship owner)
▪ ferry passengers with a vehicle (travelling from Tunisia or Greece to Italy, for example), may continue on their vehicle to their home country (the Netherlands or Germany, for example). In this case, they are allowed to remain in Italy for no more than 24 hours, which may be extended by a further 12 hours in exceptional circumstances

Before boarding the airplane/ferry to Italy, you will be required to complete a self-certification form clearly indicating that you are only passing through Italy on your way to your final destination in a foreign country. If stopped and checked by law enforcement officers during their journey through Italy you must show this self-certification form, specifying the same reason. If you have developed, or develop Covid-19 symptoms while in Italy, you must immediately notify the competent health authorities, by calling the dedicated helplines and await instructions. Before undertaking any travel, you are advised to search for information regarding travel restrictions in place in Italy, as well as in the countries of origin, transit and destination. When travelling through Italy you are advised to keep in touch with your consular authorities. From 03 June, there will be no travel restrictions in place to Italy from the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. If during the 14 days prior to entering Italy you spent any length of time in countries other than those listed above, you shall be required to continue to observe the above-mentioned transit rules.

7. I am travelling to Italy by air. Can I catch a connecting or other flight for another domestic or international destination?
Yes, airport transit is allowed, as long as you do not leave the airport transit area. In any case, travel to your final destination must always be justified by work, urgent and health reasons.

8. I am a foreign / Italian citizen temporarily in Italy. Can I travel to the country where I live?
Yes, travel to return home is always allowed. However, when travelling in Italy you must complete a self-certification form to reach the Italian border, which can be downloaded at the Interior Ministry website. You are advised to search for information regarding travel restrictions to and in your country of destination, in respect of the Covid-19 emergency. You are also advised to keep in touch with your consular authorities in Italy.

9. I am travelling to Italy from abroad. Can I ask someone to come and pick me up by car, on arrival at the airport / railway station / port?
Yes, but one person only and only if he or she is a member of your household and is possibly wearing personal protective equipment. This type of travel is allowed for urgent reasons and requires the presentation of a fully-completed self-certification form if you are stopped and checked, which can be downloaded from the Interior Ministry website, specifying the destination address and the route.

Source: Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation | Updated 19 May 2020 | Italian nationals returning to Italy and foreigners in Italy


18 May 2020 - Shops, bars, restaurants reopen in Italy

Shops, bars and restaurants are reopening on 18 May, as Italy steps up phase two by further easing the lockdown measures imposed due to the coronavirus emergency.

Hairdressers, barbers, beauty salons and beaches are reopening too after Premier Giuseppe Conte signed off a new timetable for phase two following talks with regional governments, which have the power to vary the measures on the basis of local conditions.

People must wear facemasks in closed public places and on public transport and social-distancing rules must be respected. But they no longer need to carry around a self-certification statement declaring their reason for being outside as long as they are moving around in their home region.

An initial easing of the lockdown measures that saw around four million people return to work took place two weeks ago.

Swimming pools, gyms and other sports facilities are set to reopen on 25 May.

Then movements between regions will be possible from 03 June, when European borders are also set to reopen.

Theatres and cinemas are set to return to work on 15 June.

Source: Italian Ministry of Health | Updated 18 May 2020 | Shops, bars, restaurants reopen in Italy


14 May 2020 - Phase 2: beaches open but with precise anti-contagion rules

Italy's beaches will be able to open but with precise rules to minimize the risk of coronavirus contagion, according to a document drafted by The Higher Health Institute - ISS and the National Institute for Insurance against Accidents at Work - INAIL.

In order to make it possible to limit access to beach establishments to a set number of people, the document recommends "obligatory bookings, including for time periods during the day and "the use of fast payment systems, with contactless cards or apps/web portals. "The routes to enter and exit should also be differentiated, where possible, with clear signage" is also recommended.

No pools
The use of swimming pools within the establishments will be banned. "Play-sporting activities that can cause gatherings and group games should be avoided and, for the same reason, the use of any swimming pools within the establishments should be forbidden," it said. The document also said that "surveillance of the social-distancing rules among children must be guaranteed".

Deck chairs and beach beds not positioned under a sun umbrella must be arranged a certain distance apart.

The minimum distance between rows of sun umbrellas will be 5 metres and it will be 4.5 metres for those in the same row. Deck chairs and beach beds will have to be least two metres apart, with the only exception being for members of the same family or people who live together.

Hygiene
In any case, it will be necessary to make sure all surfaces are sanitised before the facilities are allocated to a new user, including during the same day.

Cabins
As for the beach cabins "promiscuous use should be banned, except for members of the same family or people who share the same residence".

Toilets and showers
It said that social distancing of at least two metres should be respected in toilets and showers "unless barriers separate units".

Local rules
As for beaches that are free for everyone to enter and are not managed by establishments, "the methods of access and use must be set locally, identifying the most effective and suitable rules" bearing in mind their specific characteristics.

Source: Italian Ministry of Health | Updated 14 May 2020 | Phase 2: beaches open but with precise anti-contagion rules


04 May 2020 - Covid-19 Phase two: what's opening and what you can do

The gradual easing of Italy's lockdown starts today, 04 May, with the reopening of manufacturing activities taking around 4.4 million workers back out of their homes.

It is now possible for everyone to go out to do exercise in Italy's parks, which are reopening, and to visit relatives and "steady" loved ones, and no longer just to do the shopping or for health reasons.

Here is a roundup of which sectors are reopening, which are not and what you can do.

Manufacturing
The manufacturing and construction sectors are returning to work, along with wholesale retailers linked to the active sectors. According to labour consultants, 4.4 million people are returning to their workplaces.

Restaurants
Bars and restaurants can reopen, but only for takeaway services and home deliveries.

Retail
Retail activities remain suspended apart from those shops already authorised (food, personal hygiene, news agents, pharmacies, tobacconists, bookshops, stores selling clothes for children, those selling flowers and plants, and, very soon, bicycles).

Visiting relatives
People are also being allowed out to visit relatives and other loved ones, but they will have to wear facemasks and big family gatherings are not permitted. Visits to friends are not allowed.

No travel outside the region
It is only permitted to move in one's region of residence.

Second homes
People are not allowed to visit their holiday homes, unless it is for necessary maintenance work, although even in this case, the trip must be within one's region of residence.

People away from their home town
Students and workers who were blocked away from their home towns during the lockdown, can now return to their "domicile, home or residence", but they will not be able to then go back to the region that they set off from.

Public transport
Public transport is one of the key factors for phase two. The regional governments have the job of making sure services operate while social-distancing rules are respected. There are criteria limiting how many people can be inside a vehicle and it is obligatory to wear facemasks and, in some regions, single-use gloves.

Parks and physical exercise
Parks and public gardens are reopening, but children's play areas are not, and distances must be respected. Limitation on doing exercise only "in the vicinity of one's home" has been removed. So, it is possible to move, including via car, to reach the area where one wants to go jogging or do exercise.

Individual sports
Training is permitted behind closed doors for individual sports for athletes (professional and non) declared of national interest by Italian Olympic Committee CONI. The interior ministry has said that individual training "in public and private spaces" is also allowed for team-sport athletes.

University
Universities can hold exams and sessions for the presentation of degree theses, while respecting social distancing. Laboratories can operate too as well as placement programmes.

Funerals and cemeteries
Funerals are permitted but a maximum of 15 people can attend, and facemasks must be worn. It is also possible to visit cemeteries, but Masses remain banned for the moment.

Source: Italian Ministry of Health | Updated 04 May 2020 | Covid-19. Phase two: what's opening and what you can do

 

IATA website - Latest update published on 03 June 2020

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter
- This does not apply to:
- nationals or residents of Italy;
- passengers traveling on business;
- passengers traveling for urgent health reasons;
- healthcare personnel traveling on duty;
- passengers traveling for emergency reasons;
- passengers returning via Italy to their country of residence;
- passengers arriving from Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
2. Residence permits issued by Italy which have expired between 31 January and 31 July 2020, are considered valid until 31 August 2020.
3. Passengers must present a completed self-declaration form to the transporting carrier and must communicate their entry to the Department of Prevention at local health units (ASL) of the entrance district.
- This does not apply to passengers arriving from Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
4. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
- This does not apply to passengers arriving from Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
- This does not apply to passengers traveling on business if their stay in Italy does not exceed 72 hours and if granted, the additional 48 hours of a justified extension for specific needs.

For updates check on the International Air Transport Association (IATA) website​.

All the updates on the activities implemented by the Italian National Service are available on Civil Protection Department website.


SLOVENIA - 29 May 2020

Ljubljana, 18 May 2020 - About half of children in Slovenia will return to schools and kindergartens today as part of a major easing of quarantine restrictions in the country. Moreover, all shops will be allowed to open, and bars and restaurants will be able to serve patrons indoors again, while most restrictions have been lifted for sports as well.

In a step that coincides with the government declaring the end of the epidemic last Thursday and a week after the relaunch of public transport, Slovenia is reopening kindergartens, primary schools for the first three grades and the final year, as well as secondary schools for final-year students.

Under instructions issued by the Education Ministry, up to 10-15 children are allowed to sit in a single classroom in primary and secondary schools, and up to 8-10 children in an individual kindergarten group.

All school employees and ninth graders will be required to wear face masks, but the latter only outside their classroom.

Another major novelty is the almost full reopening of the hospitality and tourism sectors. The only facilities that must remain closed are accommodation facilities with over 30 rooms, accommodation for spa guests, wellness and fitness centres, pools and water parks.

The entire tourism industry has been shut down for two months in a bid to contain the epidemic and this is the first easing of restrictions in this sector.

All providers will have to abide by public health rules mandating a safe distance between guests and other safety precautions. Multi-bedded rooms will for instance only be available to members of the same household.

Meanwhile, the decision to allow all stores to reopen will come as a relief in particular for large retailers, as smaller shops with up to 400m2 of shopping area reopened two weeks ago.

Bars and restaurants were allowed to reopen on 04 May as well, but they could only serve outside. And while most operations will now be allowed to fully reopen, the ban continues for night clubs.

Protective measures remain in place, meaning the obligatory use of masks, hand disinfection and 1.5 metre distance in shops, while bar and restaurant guest will be able to take their masks off when seated.

A lot of extra work awaits clothing shops, where dressing rooms will need to be disinfected and aired after each customer and tried out clothing that is not bought set aside for two days.

Another key restriction being lifted is the ban on gatherings in public places. Up to 50 people are allowed to gather outdoors as of today, but only if the safety distance recommended by the health authorities can be secured. Concerts, parties and similar events for instance remain banned.

This means no spectators at sports events, which are also officially allowed again as of today, including in team sports. Moreover, allowed again is practice and recreation in indoor facilities, the exceptions being fitness and wellness centres and swimming pools.

Slovenian Football Association (NZS) president Radenko Mijatović told the STA that the plan was to organise the first football games in the first or second week of June.

Source: STA (2020). Bulk of coronavirus restrictions lifted today, schools reopen


Ljubljana, 15 May 2020 - EU residents are free to cross into Slovenia from Austria, Italy and Hungary at pre-determined checkpoints while most non-EU nationals will have to undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine, in what is a major step for the country as it accelerates the easing of restrictions.

Under the government decree adopted late on Thursday, there will be 19 checkpoints on the border with Austria, nine on the border with Italy and five on the border with Hungary.

The listed checkpoints largely correspond to checkpoints where passengers may cross at present.

Some crossings are open only to locals or daily cross-border commuters and special exemptions are in place for owners of land on both sides of the border.

Three airports and two ports are among the ports of entry listed in the government decree.

The decree also covers Slovenia's border with the EU, which is the external EU border, but there it does not limit crossing to specific checkpoints.

Under the new rules, those with permanent or temporary residence in the EU will be given instructions issued by the National Institute of Public Health upon entering Slovenia but will not need to quarantine, which they have to do for seven days at present.

When such a person declares they have coronavirus or symptoms thereof, or clearly show symptoms, they will be rejected at the border if they do not have permanent residence in Slovenia; those who do will be referred to medical services.

Third-country nationals must undergo a mandatory two-week quarantine, with exceptions for diplomats, members of rescue and relief services, attendance of funeral, lorry drivers and persons with certificates issued by the competent Slovenian ministry showing they will provide urgent services.

Notably, if it is believed a person entering the country may not be able to leave because of the measures of neighbouring countries, they will be denied entry.

The new policy will initially benefit mostly owners of property in Croatia, thousands of whom have been keen to visit their holiday homes but many reluctant to do so due to the mandatory seven-day quarantine upon return.

But even more importantly, it paves the way for a relaunch of cross-border tourism, which has been suspended for two months due to lockdown measures around the world.

It will also be a relief for businesses, which have been calling on the government to relax rules for business travel as cross-border commerce kicks into higher gear.

The decree was adopted last night, after the government formally declared the epidemic over while keeping in place all measures adopted to combat the disease.

Slovenia has had low single-digit daily case increases since the end of April and the epidemic is seen as being under control.

The country has so far confirmed 1,464 Covid-19 cases and 103 people have died.

Source: STA (2020). New regime in place on Slovenian borders


Ljubljana, 12 May 2020 - International air passenger transport with Slovenia can resume from today after being banned on 17 March as part of the measures aimed at containing the coronavirus epidemic in the country.

The government decided last night not to extend restrictions again, allowing resumption of passenger flights from the EU and third countries to Slovenia's international airports.

While flights can resume to airports in Ljubljana, Maribor and Portorož, the ban on flights from abroad to local airports remains in place until 12 June.

In a press release, the Government Communication Office said the ban was no longer necessary or sensible because following strict safety measures in individual countries air carriers were not providing flights anyway due to a lack of demand among passengers because of the epidemic.

Slovenia does not have an air carrier since Adria Airways went into receivership last year.

Fraport Slovenia, which operates Ljubljana Airport, said the lifting of the ban would help airlines plan flights, but also noted that most of them had cancelled flights until the end of May.

The airport has already put in place measures and equipment to be able to welcome first passengers and resume operations safely.

Passengers will be required to keep a 1.5 metre distance from each other inside the passenger terminal and their numbers in the terminal and on buses will be reduced to half the capacity.

Only passengers and staff will be allowed inside the terminal and they will be required to sanitise their hands every time on entering it. Passengers will have to wear masks or other mouth and nose covering inside the terminal and special safety measures will apply to the staff.

Temperature screenings will probably be mandatory for at least part of the passengers, but the measures and protocols are still being coordinated with the National Institute of Public Health.

Source: STA (2020). Passenger air transport allowed to resume


Ljubljana, 11 May 2020 - Public transport will start running in Slovenia again after nearly two months on Monday. The relaunch will be gradual and restrictive measure will be in place to ensure social distancing is observed.

Passengers will have to disinfect their hands upon entry, wear a face mask and keep a safety distance of at least 1.5 metres.

Buses are to be outfitted with special barriers for drivers and unless these are in place, passengers will not be able to enter through the front door.

Until then, passenger will also not be able to buy tickets on the bus. Ticket purchase will be possible at bigger stops and stations, online and at ticket machines. The same is also advised by railways operator Slovenske Železnice.

About every other seat on train will be off limits, so as to ensure social distancing, Slovenske Železnice said on Friday.

At their last stop, the buses and trains will have to be aired and disinfected.

Most public transport operators are planning a gradual restart, with Slovenske Železnice planning to dispatch only 30% of their coaches today.

Because many people have questions about how public transport will run, the Infrastructure Ministry opened an info hotline available at 01 478 8512.

Meanwhile, international passenger transport remains suspended. Infrastructure Minister Jernej Vrtovec has previously mentioned 01 June as a possible date of relaunch.

Vrtovec told the TV Slovenija news show Dnevnik last night that passenger air transport may also be relaunched this week.

Source: STA (2020). Public transport restarting

 

Ljubljana, 04 May 2020 - A major easing of quarantine restrictions entered into effect

Quarantine restrictions will be eased further on 04 May 2020 as stores under 400m2 reopen along with bar terraces, hair salons and beauty parlours. People will again be able to visit museums, libraries as of this week, and go to church. Moreover, professional athletes will be allowed to train again.

Despite the easing of restrictions, safety measures will still apply. In case of bars and restaurants, this means that tables will have to be arranged in a way to allow customers to keep one-metre distance. Guests will also have to wear masks or other protection to go to the toilet or enter any other closed rooms. Owners will have to regularly disinfect and air their premises. Stores under 400m2 will reopen, except for those in shopping malls which do not have their own entrance.

Hair and massage salons, and beauty parlours will welcome one customer at a time, and the customers will have to wear a face mask. Those working in the salons and beauty parlours will have to wear a face mask, visor and gloves.

The services of making or repairing textile products, footwear and leather products will also be available again, along with key cutting, photography, watchmaking, and photocopying services. Seamstresses and jewellers will also open their door again.

Top athletes competing in individual and team sports will be allowed to train again but only individually.

Also opening this week are museums, libraries and galleries, having received the government's permission to reopen before the May holidays, who have taken more time to prepare for the reopening. General libraries reopen on 04 May 2020, while most galleries and museums will open their door again from 05 May 2020. Some bookshops are already open.

This is the latest round of easing of restrictions for businesses since 19 April, when takeaway restaurants, DIY stores, car showrooms, car washes, stores selling bicycles, technical goods and furniture stores, dry cleaners, some repair shops, and insurance agents started working again following the government imposed temporary ban on most retail establishments since mid-March.

Source: STA (2020). More services available to Slovenians as of today

The situation in Slovenia

The number of tests conducted and confirmed cases of new coronavirus infection, as published by the National Institute of Public Health (NIJZ) on its website, is changing daily also in Slovenia.

An epidemic was declared and restrictions have been placed on public life. Grocery stores, pharmacies, petrol stations, banks, post offices and newsstands remain open. However, the use of online services is recommended (eg online shopping, online banking, etc).

Grocery stores are open from at least 8.00am to 6.00pm and are closed on Sundays (adjusted working time). Between 8.00am and 10.00am and during the last opening hour, priority to enter shops is given to vulnerable groups, including disabled people, pensioners and pregnant women.

In line with the gradual relaxation of restrictive measures, the government ordinance provides for the resumption of some sales and service activities after 20 April 2020.

Visit Slovenian Government website for further information

Based on relevant ordinance, movement outside the municipality of permanent or temporary residence has been allowed again since 30 April 2020.

Movement, access to and staying in a public place still remain prohibited in accordance with the ordinance of 30 March 2020 imposing a general prohibition of:

▪ movement and gathering of people in public places and areas
▪ access to public places and areas

Movement, access to and staying in a public place is exceptionally permitted to individuals, subject to their maintaining a safe distance from other persons, for the following purposes: arriving to and departing from work; protection and assistance to persons in need of support; access to emergency services; access to grocery stores and health, toiletries and beauty retailers; access to the sale of medical products and medical aids and sanitary aids; access to food stores for animals; access to petrol stations, banks and post offices, municipal waste services, automotive service and repair shops, libraries, museums, galleries or other exemptions.

Public transportation - public bus and railway passenger transport, gondolas and funicular railways - has been suspended until further notice.

Taxi transport is allowed in urgent cases. Taxi drivers must, before collecting their next passenger, disinfect all parts of the vehicle that normally come into contact with passengers.

Tourist attractions, cinemas, catering establishments, accommodation, wellness centres and all other public institutions are closed until further notice. All public events are cancelled. For detailed information, please visit the websites of specific providers.

Moving outside

It is advised to stay at home, but trips to nature are still allowed if you go by yourself (individually) or together with your family members or members of the same household (in a group of up to 5 persons). When outside, you must act responsibly towards yourself and others and follow the rules of social-distancing and keep a compulsory safety distance of at least 1.5 metres.

According to the recommendations of the National Institute of Public Health, physical activity reduces the risk of viral infection and reduces anxiety that may be caused by (self-)isolation to prevent the spread of the virus.

Access to public parks and other areas for walking is only permitted within the municipality of an individual’s permanent or temporary residence.

Movement in public places is exceptionally permitted to groups of persons who are close family members or members of the same household, provided it is possible to ensure a safe distance from the movement of other similar groups. An exemption to the prohibition are also groups of up to five co-workers if they are sharing the same personal vehicle to commute to or from work.

When moving or staying in a closed public space, it is mandatory to maintain a safe distance from others. It is also mandatory to use protective masks or other means of protecting the mouth and nose area (scarf or other similar protection) that covers the nose and mouth, as is hand disinfection.

The Mountain Rescue Association of Slovenia discourages activities in the hills, especially in the mountains, where there is a greater risk of injury, as accidents in the mountains put additional strain on the already overburdened healthcare system. All mountain huts remain closed.

We suggest that you choose less frequented paths and we explicitly advise you against visiting very popular tourist destinations, as there is a greater chance of infection transmission.

Airports and national borders

All air traffic to and from Ljubljana Airport is suspended. Detailed information is available at the Ljubljana Airport website.

All public railway passenger transport is suspended as well.

Special border crossing regimes have been established to prevent the spread of infection, including within the Schengen area (at the borders with Italy, Austria and Hungary), where temporary traffic restrictions are now in place. The entry and exit requirements have been changed.

Since 11 April 2020, a seven-day quarantine has been imposed on entry into Slovenia. Testing for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection is mandatory on the last day of quarantine. If a swab cannot be taken, the quarantine is extended for seven days.

The requirement of a quarantine does not apply to exemptions listed in the ordinance including cross-border commuters, cross-border weekly commuters, persons carrying out the transport of goods, goods transport in transit, transit passengers, persons owning or renting land on both sides of the national border that are citizens of Slovenia, Austria, Italy or Hungary.

The entry of persons, assumed to be unable to leave the territory of the Republic of Slovenia due to measures taken by its neighbouring countries, is not permitted.

All passengers wishing to cross the Slovenian border are informed via text message of the preventive measures in force in Slovenia.

Entry into Slovenia on all borders is limited for freight traffic. Updated traffic information is available on the website of the Traffic Information Centre.

Foreign citizens who are located in the Republic of Slovenia and are unable to return to their country of origin due to the current situation are advised to seek assistance at the nearest diplomatic mission of their country.

Border with Italy

Checkpoints have been set up in the border area at road connections with Italy where the aforementioned entry requirements apply. The checkpoints are open at all times, unless otherwise indicated.

▪ Vrtojba - St Andrea
▪ Fernetiči - Fernetti
▪ Škofije - Rabuese
▪ Krvavi potok - Pesse (open from 5.00am to 11.00pm)

Crossing the state border at the checkpoints Robič - Stupizza (open from 5.00am to 6.00pm, closed on Sundays and public holidays) and Rateče - Fusine is allowed only to commuters and other persons on the basis of a local community certificate that justifies the need for crossing the border (economic and agricultural activities).

Railway passenger transport as well as international occasional and line bus service between Italy and Slovenia is suspended.

Entry into Italy is subject to mandatory quarantine for anyone who is sick and to 14-day self-isolation. Some persons who cross the border for justified reasons (filling out a self-declaration form) are excepted, but they must return within 72 hours (plus exceptionally an additional 48 hours).  Those commuting to work for the companies headquartered in Italy are also excepted.

Border with Croatia

All border crossings for local border traffic with Croatia are suspended. Passengers who intend to cross the border between Slovenia and Croatia may use international border-crossing points.

Entry into Croatia is prohibited for all passengers, except nationals of Croatia working abroad (self-isolation required) and EU and third country nationals residing in the EU who are returning home (prior approval required). When entering Croatia, passengers arriving from high-risk countries are required to self-isolate for 14 days (including passengers from the entire territory of Slovenia). This measure does not apply to commuters (except to those from the regions of Bela Krajina and Dolenjska that are subject to mandatory isolation), health professionals, diplomats, police and civil protection members.

When entering Slovenia, border checks are carried out as usual, with the exception of persons Croatia has ordered to self-isolate or stay in quarantine; they are required to provide a certificate on the completion of quarantine/self-isolation period in Croatia or a certificate of health. The Croatian security authorities have exempted cargo vehicle drivers from self-isolation.

From 31 March 2020, in addition to the other entry requirements, at all border crossing points at the external Schengen border, passengers who are third-country nationals wishing to enter the country are also subject to checks on the necessity of their travel.

Visit Slovenian Police website for more information on border crossing points.

Source: Republic of Slovenia - Slovenian Tourist Board

 

IATA website - Latest update published on 16 June 2020

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter Slovenia.
- This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Montenegro, Norway, Slovakia or Switzerland.
- This does not apply to nationals and residents of Slovenia.
- This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Monaco, Montenegro, North Macedonia (Rep.), San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City (Holy See) returning via Slovenia to their country of residence.
- This does not apply to passengers with diplomatic passports.
2. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
- This does not apply to nationals and residents of Slovenia arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
- This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Montenegro, Norway, Slovakia or Switzerland.

For updates check on the International Air Transport Association (IATA) website​.


SAFETRAVEL NZ - 08 June 2020

Do Not Travel Overseas At This Time

SafeTravel NZ currently advises that all New Zealanders do not travel overseas at this time due to the outbreak of COVID-19, associated health risks and travel restrictions. Due to the difficulty travellers are experiencing returning home, New Zealanders overseas need to take steps to stay safely where they are and shelter in place.

Countries and territories around the world are imposing strict travel restrictions. Many air routes are no longer viable. The options for New Zealanders to return home have reduced significantly. The Government is committed to helping New Zealanders overseas where they can. The international situation is complex and changing quickly, and some things are out of their control. Government assisted departure (repatriation) flights should not be relied upon to get home.

Government recognises that not all New Zealanders who want to return home are able to do so. New Zealanders who cannot return home for the time being should take steps to stay safely where they are.

Please note that in some cases the ability of the New Zealand Government to provide consular assistance may be limited due to restrictions on movement and other services.

Consider whether you have access to health care and support systems if you get sick while overseas. Be aware that you may be placed in quarantine, be required to self-isolate or be subject to strict movement restrictions. Your travel insurance may be affected by the outbreak of COVID-19. Contact your travel insurer if you have questions or concerns about whether you are covered by your insurance policy for any potential COVID-19 related expenses. Make sure you can access money to cover emergencies and unexpected delays.

Although individual destination pages on SafeTravel NZ may not display a ‘do not travel’ advice level, this advice applies to all overseas destinations. If you choose to travel despite this advice, these destination pages remain an essential source of information on specific risks and contact information in that destination:

Update on Croatia
https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/croatia
There is no specific warning in place for Croatia as at 08 June 2020

Update on Italy
https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/italy

Update on Slovenia
https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/slovenia
There is no specific warning in place for Slovenia as at 08 June 2020

Advice for New Zealanders currently overseas​
 SafeTravel NZ's most up to date advice on returning home can be found here. For information on border restrictions see the Immigration New Zealand website. You can also call Immigration New Zealand on 0508 225 288 (within New Zealand) or +64 9 952 1679 (outside New Zealand).

About COVID-19

On 31 December 2019, the World Health Organization was informed of cases of a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and death.

New Zealand moved to Alert Level 2 at 11:59pm on Wednesday 13 May. For more information on what this means, visit the New Zealand Government’s dedicated COVID-19 website.

Please see the Ministry of Health website for guidance on prevention, signs and symptoms, and treatment of COVID-19. This also includes advice for travellers. If you are looking for advice about self-isolation requirements, please call Healthline on 0800 611 116 (available within New Zealand only). If you are outside New Zealand, please see the Ministry of Health website. 

Detailed health information is available on the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For a list of countries, territories and locations with confirmed cases of COVID-19 please see the latest situation report from the World Health Organization.

Border restrictions

For information on countries and territories which have COVID-19 related border restrictions affecting foreign nationals, including  travellers in transit, refer to the International Air Transport Association (IATA) website.

The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade does not provide immigration advice for entry to other countries and territories. The border authorities of the country or territory you are travelling to determine your eligibility for entry. If you choose to travel despite this advice, consult the official website or the nearest embassy/consulate of your country or territory of destination to find out about any border controls that may apply to you before travelling.

Advice for New Zealanders Overseas

If you are a New Zealander overseas you must register your details on SafeTravel to receive important country or territory specific information. It is important that you keep your SafeTravel registration details up to date so that you continue to receive updates. If your original travel plans have changed and you are unsure how long you will be overseas for you may want to set a longer term 'date of departure' in your registration details. This will ensure that you continue to be registered on SafeTravel as travelling or residing in your location. Once you return home you should update your registration details to show that you are no longer travelling.

If you require assistance, contact your closest New Zealand Embassy or High Commission, or call the consular emergency line on +64 99 202 020 (if overseas) or 0800 301 030 (in New Zealand). For more information on New Zealand border measures and isolation requirements on return to New Zealand, see the Immigration New Zealand and New Zealand Ministry of Health websites.

New Zealanders returning to New Zealand

Transit arrangements

▪ New Zealand has entered into transit arrangements with a range of countries to make it easier for each other’s citizens to get home. New Zealand has made specific arrangements with Australia, Chile, Canada, the United States and a number of other countries, so that in most cases these locations can be used as transit hubs for New Zealand citizens returning to New Zealand. However, these transit arrangements cannot guarantee your transit through these countries, all travellers must also comply with any specific transit restrictions and requirements for all countries they are transiting en route to New Zealand. Many countries have specific restrictions which may prevent travellers transiting when travelling from certain countries. You should check that you comply with these restrictions before booking your travel.

▪ Returning New Zealanders who need to transit these or other countries/territories should be aware that circumstances are changing quickly, and there is no exhaustive list of available options. Always check with your airline/travel agent that you have current information about your transit options to ensure you will be able to travel to your final destination. Country specific travel restrictions (including transit restrictions) are also available on the International Air Transport Association (IATA) website.

▪ Further details of New Zealand's transit arrangements with other countries can be found on the Immigration New Zealand website (under the heading ‘Transiting and Departing from New Zealand’). Further transit arrangements continue to be negotiated.

Transiting the United States

In early April New Zealand entered into a Reciprocal Transit Arrangement with the US. It allows “New Zealand citizens, New Zealand residents and third country nationals who have an approved ESTA or valid visa [to] transit the United States of America, so long as they have not been physically present in any of the following regions for the 14 days prior to entry into the United States: Iran, China, United Kingdom, Ireland and any country in the Schengen Zone”. Foreign nationals who visited China, Iran, European Schengen area, United Kingdom in the past 14 days cannot enter the US. The Department of Homeland Security (US Customs and Border Protection) advises “there is no delineation between those attempting to enter for transit versus those attempting to enter for business or other”.

Transiting Australia

New Zealand citizens, residents and immediate family who wish to transit Australia on their way home to New Zealand are subject to both Australian Federal and State Government requirements.

At the Federal level, the Australian Border Force are permitting transits of up to 72 hours for New Zealanders, requiring transits of more than eight hours to leave the airport. New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria State Governments' have 14 days mandatory quarantine requirements for those arriving from overseas.

However, the New Zealand Government does not provide advice on the immigration requirements of other countries, which can be subject to change quickly. Travellers are strongly encouraged to monitor the Home Affairs website and liaise with their travel agent/airline/insurance provider for up-to-date information.

Given the strengthened border measures in New Zealand and Australia, travellers should allow extra time for check in given the likely requirement for non-Australian passport holders to be individually checked for permission to transit Australia en route to New Zealand. This permission will likely involve reference back to head office for confirmation and so may take time given current call volumes.

Isolation requirements in New Zealand

All travellers entering New Zealand from 10 April 2020 are required to:

▪ go into ‘managed isolation’ in a government-provided facility (hotel), or
▪ if you have COVID-19 symptoms, go into a quarantine facility (separate hotel)

You will need to stay there for at least 14 days. This will prevent any further unmanaged COVID-19 infection coming into New Zealand. You can’t self-isolate at home, or take a domestic flight before the 14-day period is completed.

Health screening on your arrival

You will be met at the airport by government officials who will explain the requirements and answer any questions. You will also be screened for COVID-19 symptoms. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 or are waiting for COVID-19 test results, you will be placed in a quarantine facility (separate hotel).

Otherwise, you will be placed in a managed isolation facility (hotel). You will have regular contact with the government repatriation team who will coordinate all movement and welfare support.

Payment for accommodation

The All-of-Government Response is paying for the cost of the accommodation and meals for those requiring managed isolation or quarantine.

Provisions while in managed isolation or quarantine

On arrival into New Zealand each passenger or family group will be assessed by an assessing officer at the airport and requirements for provisions determined at this point.

Any items required such as provisions for infants ie formula, nappies etc will be purchased through this process and delivered to your hotel room. This is a user pays system. Note: it is recommended that you arrive with enough provision for infants to last you for the first 24 hours in the hotel. This will allow time for provisions to be purchased for you.

Otherwise, you should limit the amount of baggage you bring with you, be aware that New Zealand has strict biosecurity requirements that will be enforced on arrival. For your safety and the safety of others we suggest disposing of risk goods prior to travel. Otherwise risk items must be declared on arrival. More information can be found on the Ministry for Primary Industries website.

▪ All meals are provided in managed isolation/quarantine, so there is no need to bring additional food into New Zealand for the duration of your stay.
▪ New Zealand’s standard biosecurity screening requirements remain in place - no illegal or perishable food items and cooking ingredients (for example fruit, vegetables, eggs, and honey) will be permitted to be brought into New Zealand.
▪ Only small quantities of non-perishable food (such as sweets, biscuits etc) will be allowed to be brought into New Zealand and taken to managed isolation/quarantine facilities. Ensure you pack these in your carry-on luggage so they can be easily checked by biosecurity officials on arrival.
▪ Bringing these items in your checked or cabin baggage will delay your arrival processing into New Zealand and your allocation into a managed isolation/quarantine facility. This is because checking cabin baggage requires additional screening and interaction with border staff. This poses unnecessary risk to staff who are working to facilitate your entry into New Zealand.
▪ (For flights arriving from the Pacific) Umu boxes require additional screening and interaction with border staff, and may not be allowed to be taken to isolation/quarantine facilities. Please avoid bringing Umu boxes with you.
▪ For any food items/cooking ingredients, declare on your arrival card and inform biosecurity officers at the check point. Failure to do so could result in a delay in processing on arrival or a $400 fine.
▪ Alcohol should only be consumed in moderation during your stay in managed isolation/quarantine.

Further information about New Zealand's isolation requirements and facilities can be found on the New Zealand Government’s dedicated COVID-19 website and the Ministry of Health website.

Current border measures in New Zealand

As of Thursday 19 March 2020, most foreign travellers can no longer enter New Zealand. New Zealand citizens, permanent residents, residents with valid travel conditions can still come to New Zealand. Immediate family of New Zealand citizens and residents (partner or spouse, legal guardian and dependent children under the age of 24) must seek approval from Immigration New Zealand using the limited exceptions process. Immediate family members cannot travel by themselves. They must travel with the New Zealand citizen or resident family member on the same flight to New Zealand. New Zealand Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand must also seek approval from Immigration New Zealand using the limited exceptions process.

For further information regarding these border changes, visas and exemptions please read the information on the Immigration New Zealand website or contact Immigration New Zealand on +64 09 952 1679 (outside New Zealand) 0508 225 288 (within New Zealand).

Some countries (including Thailand and Fiji) now require a recent medical certificate before boarding a plane to transit through their countries. Check with your airline for the most up-to-date information on travel requirements.

Staying safe wherever you are

If you are unable to return to New Zealand, we encourage you to take the following steps to stay safely where you are:

▪ Follow the advice of local authorities. Be ready to comply with local isolation or quarantine requirements and to rely on the local health system. Find out how to access healthcare in case it becomes necessary to do so
▪ Take care to minimise your risk of exposure to COVID-19 by following the advice of the World Health Organisation and New Zealand Ministry of Health
▪ Find suitable accommodation
▪ Make sure you have access to enough medication if you are overseas for longer than planned
▪ Keep your family and friends regularly informed of your plans and well-being
▪ Monitor local media for developments
▪ Be prepared for logistical and financial disruption. Make sure you can access money to cover emergencies and unexpected delays. New Zealanders facing financial hardship overseas should seek assistance from family or friends or contact their bank in the first instance. Check with your insurance provider to see if they can help.
▪ Look after yourself - your emotional and mental wellbeing is important. Stay in touch with your usual supports - whānau, friends and workmates, especially if you are self-isolating. Further tips can be found on the Government’s COVID-19 website.
▪ Register on SafeTravel and keep checking the website for updates
▪ For more detailed country-specific advice, check the office travel advice of the US, UK and Australia too; and
▪ Contact your nearest New Zealand Embassy or Consulate if you require consular assistance. Contact details are listed in each destination page on the SafeTravel. For urgent consular assistance after-hours please contact +64 99 202 020 (monitored 24 hours a day).

Please note that in some cases the ability of the New Zealand Government to provide consular assistance may be limited due to restrictions on movement and other services.

Advice for New Zealanders considering overseas travel

The New Zealand Government is advising that New Zealanders do not travel overseas at this time due to the outbreak of COVID-19, associated health risks and travel restrictions. There may be a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 overseas. You may come in contact with more people than usual, including during long-haul flights and in crowded airports. Health care systems in some countries may come under strain and may not be as well-equipped as New Zealand’s or have the capacity to support foreigners.

COVID-19 and travel disruptions

Overseas travel has become more complex and unpredictable, and many countries are introducing entry or movement restrictions. Most flights to New Zealand have ceased. A number of these border restrictions apply to New Zealanders, including those seeking to transit through these countries or territories to New Zealand, as well as those arriving via cruise ship. These are changing often and quickly. Your travel plans may be disrupted. You may be placed in quarantine or denied entry to some countries.

If you still wish to return to New Zealand, consult the International Air Transport Association (IATA) website and the immigration website of the relevant country before you travel for more information on border restrictions. For information on Australian border restrictions, visit the Australian Home Affairs website. As border restrictions continue to change, sometimes with little or no notice, check these websites regularly.

The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade does not provide immigration advice for entry to other countries and territories. The border authorities of the country or territory you are travelling to determine your eligibility for entry.

For further travel advice and information about  COVID-19, please see the webpage here.

Reviewed: 27 May 2020, 11:29

TRAVEL INSURANCE
New Zealander’s travelling or living in Croatia, Slovenia and Italy & surrounding European destinations should have comprehensive medical and travel insurance policies in place that include provision for medical evacuation by air. Some insurance policies are now providing medical cover related to coronavirus while overseas.


For up to date information and advice please refer to the following websites:

USEFUL LINKS

New Zealand - Dedicated Healthline 0800 number for COVID-19 health advice and information
The number is 0800 358 5453 (or for international SIMs +64 9 358 5453)
It is free and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

New Zealand Government - Unite Against COVID-19
https://covid19.govt.nz/

Immigration New Zealand - COVID-19
https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/covid-19

SafeTravel NZ - Official advice for New Zealanders living & travelling overseas
https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/

Visit World Health Organisation for useful reading on the Coronavirus (COVID-2019):
Q&A on travelling during the coronavirus (COVID-2019) outbreak
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/travel-advice

Coronavirus disease (COVID-2019) situation reports (updated daily)
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports

Visit the Ministry of Health for the current situation on COVID-19 in New Zealand:
https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus

Republic of Croatia - Official Government Page for COVID-19 Information
Website can be translated to English by clicking the translate button
https://www.koronavirus.hr/

Republic of Croatia - Ministry of Foreign & European Affairs
Website can be translated to English by clicking the translate button
http://www.mvep.hr/

Republic of Croatia - Ministry of Health - Croatian Institute of Public Health
Website can be translated to English by clicking the translate button
Check here for daily updates:
https://www.hzjz.hr/priopcenja-mediji/koronavirus-najnoviji-podatci/

Italian Republic - Department of Civil Protection
http://www.protezionecivile.gov.it/risk-activities/health-risk/emergencies/coronavirus

Republic of Slovenia - Government Portal
https://www.gov.si/en/topics/coronavirus-disease-covid-19/

Republic of Slovenia - Slovenian Tourist Board - Latest information about coronavirus (COVID-19) in Slovenia
https://www.slovenia.info/en/business/press-centre/information-about-the-coronavirus

European Union - Re-open EU
The European Union, and all of its member states, are planning for a safe re-opening of Europe. This interactive tool provides you with the information that you need to confidently plan your European travel and holidays, while staying healthy and safe. The information is frequently updated and available in 24 languages for your convenience.
https://reopen.europa.eu/en/

European Centre for Disease Prevention & Control
https://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en

International Air Transport Association (IATA)
https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm
https://www.iata.org/en/programs/safety/health/diseases/government-measures-related-to-coronavirus/


DISCLAIMER
Due to the everchanging nature of the situation, we cannot be held responsible for any changes or information that have not been reported. Although the information we provide is current at the time of posting, the situation is evolving daily and please always check with SafeTravel NZ, NZ Government Unite Against COVID-19, local government advisories and World Health Organisation (WHO) for the latest health and travel advice. All information is taken from the source links and all external links provided are not updated by Croatia Times Travel and Croatia Times Travel cannot be held accountable for their accuracy.